When all else fails, I could act like a fool on TV, and make more money!

Earlier on Facebook, I saw this quote from Daniel Craig. The quote itself is entertaining, but  it really makes you think how a little effort and luck can go a long way today.

Remember when actors trained in the theatre before entering Hollywood, and when singers were not starting clothing lines? Those people had true talent, and they had every right to make money off it. Now, if you turn on a show like “Keeping up with the Kardashians”, it’s fairly obvious that fame has easy access now, no talent required.

 

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Books that are recommended that really shouldn’t be

We’ve all read that book with high expectations because everyone we’ve talked to has raved about it. Then we read it, and kick ourselves for not spending all that time more wisely. This list goes from the bad books, to the absolute worst. Please, feel free to disagree with me.

Ok fine, so I’m not a “true” literature fan, but only because I thought I would die before I finished this book. I remember falling asleep while reading it, and waking up not remembering what I had just read. I don’t even remember enough of the story to expound on it here. Let’s put it this way: if I was a teacher, I would not inflict pain on my students by making them read this book.

 

 

 

I loved the books at one point too, but that was before the TV series came out. In retrospect, the books were boring compared to all the drama that the upper east siders stir up on TV. Some complained when the TV series aired that the characters did not look anything like the way they were described in the book (Jenny’s boobs and Serena’s face to be specific). The point is though, Taylor Momsen made Jenny edgier, which added to the drama. As for Serena, it’s impossible to find a woman who literally looks like a goddess. Blake Lively’s long blonde hair and height does the trick…over time.

 

I thought I would break the rule, and save the worst for last. I realize this was a number one  New York Times bestseller, but if you read deeply into the subliminal messages she sends out, you will realize that she was just really pretentious and dramatic. In the beginning, when she is describing how she feels about her marriage, and creates this whole scene of her sitting on her bathroom floor and talking to God. I disagree with how she went about her entire trip, because I didn’t fully understand why she had to give up everything for it. It was supposed to be a tell all book, but then why didn’t she disclose why she was unhappy in her marriage?  Her story is pretty common; many women travel to get away from the insanity of married life. If the author of Eat, Pray, Love deserves to be titled as a “best selling author”, then so do all those other women. Seriously, watch the movie. Julia Roberts is as fabulous as ever, even when she’s scrubbing floors…

LA Candy Review: Not So Sweet, LC

I was never a huge Lauren Conrad fan, but I was a loyal viewer of “The Hills”. I suppose this how LA Candy sparked an interest in me, and to be honest, I kind of wish it hadn’t.

Well, that’s not entirely true. The first 3/4 of the book had so many trivial details, such as what Scarlett and Jane (the main characters) were wearing and how their make up was done. I felt stupid as a person reading these details , and was dying for her to hurry the hell up before my IQ dropped too low. But then you get to the last 1/4 of the book, and it becomes so intense. I kept reading frantically, so excited to find out what happens, then there’s a cliffhanger. OMG!!! (she uses texting language a lot…and parentheses). Now, I have been forced to read the sequel, “Sweet Little Lies”. I guess LC knew that without keeping the readers guessing, nobody would buy the sequel. This is based on the assumption that the sequel is as poorly written as the first book.

Actually, I’m wrong. Poorly written does not even begin to describe the paragraph formation and the detailing in this novel. Many were quick to assume that a ghostwriter had written this for Conrad, but the truth is, I could practically hear her narrating the story as I read it. Aside from the irrelevant details, most of the characters were extremely bland, with the exception of Scarlett. I kind of wish Conrad had made Scarlett the star of the show “L.A. Candy”, and not Jane, simply because Jane was so boring. Honestly, if I was Madison Parker, I would be pissed off that Jane was the star of the show as well. I suppose in all fairness to Conrad, Jane was a reflection of herself – and I never found Conrad remotely interesting.

I give the girl an A for effort, because the plot really did have potential. It’s just unfortunate that she wasted so many pages on useless detail. Having said that, I am guilty of currently reading “Sweet Little Lies”, the sequel.

I recommend “L.A. Candy” to: girls ages 13 and above, or girls who are mature enough to understand that the chances of them living a life in reality TV are slim to none.

Top 5 reasons to block someone from your Facebook newsfeed

We have all seen those annoying Facebook statuses that make you go “wtf?” Here are my personal top 5 Facebook petpeeves

1. People who constantly quote their children on their statuses                                          Ok look, it’s understandable that parents want to share milestones such as their child’s first word or first step, but not every damn thing your kid says! All children say cute stuff, and yes most of them say cute stuff everyday. So your kid is not that different from the rest of the children their age.

2. People who complain about their financial situation                                                    Yeah, it’s a rough economy, and there are many people who are in the same boat as you if not worse off. Expounding your financial woes on Facebook will not make them better. Plus, there are some details that are best kept private, and your money issues is one of them.

3. People who always tag their location, no matter where they are                                    We all might be impressed if you’re at the best club in town, but if you’re at Safeway? Not so much. That is all.

4. People who write obscure sentences without an explanation                                     When you write something like “I’m so sad, I don’t know how this happened :(” people are bound to ask why. For God’s sakes, don’t write that if you don’t want to tell people what is wrong. Either way, you’re just looking for attention.

5. People who write super super long winded details of their day                                 “Today I woke up, and said goodbye to my boyfriend. Then I had coffee with my sister, then I had lunch with my mom, then I went shopping with my best friend and now I’m at home with my boyfriend we made dinner pasta yum!” (includes a picture of the pasta). No joke, I’ve seen a status similar to this one. We are all happy that you had such a good day, and please don’t do this again.

What are your Facebook status pet peeves?

The Ironic Unrealism of Reality TV

Turn on E! Entertainment, or MTV, and people like this will pop up in your face:

It is blatantly obvious that Reality TV is taking over the entertainment world. This genre seems to be replacing the sitcom craze of the 90s, but will it ever measure up? At least the sitcoms were funny, less superficial, and they didn’t give off the impression that anything happening on the show is remotely close to reality.

I read an interesting article which basically trashed reality TV to bits. The author (who’s name is unknown) wrote that reality TV is a pathetic excuse for media, and that “85% [of the show] is not reality.” While I completely agree with them here, reality TV can only have an effect on those who take it too seriously. Of course the shows are not “reality”, and they are only given that name because cameras follow people around, documenting their lives. Take “The Hills” for example; I am a huge fan, but I know that the show is scripted. The producers would say “this happened, but act it out this way for the cameras”. In all fairness to them, this makes absolute sense. I mean, would you watch a show about people typing all day on their computers at work? Audiences want drama, and the best way to do this is to exaggerate the drama happening in people’s lives. If you were to critique a show like “The Hills”, people would go crazy if they constantly had that much drama in their lives. I can’t speak for everyone, but I only watched “The Hills” for the thrill of 22 minutes worth of drama. And, well…maybe for Brody Jenner too.

The only sad part of reality TV is that they make people famous for absolutely nothing. A prime example would be the Kardashians. Sure they were rich before “Keeping up with the Kardashians”, but the show allowed them to build an enormous empire for themselves. I don’t personally watch the show, because I agree with Barbara Walters when she told them they have no talent. Yes,the girls are beautiful, but what about them really stands out? This is a show that is based primarily on vanity, greed, and wealth, and many people are concerned that kids who watch that show are being given the wrong values in life. Fair enough, TV can be influential, but it up to the parents of those kids to give them the correct values, whatever those may be. If reality TV is effecting someone to the point where they are changing everything they believe in, then they have a much bigger problem on their hands.

I would say the only reality shows that come close to real life are “Teen Mom”, and”16 and Pregnant”, only because they serve as a good wake up call for teenage girls. Other than that, it seems as though reality TV is the best way to become famous now, no talent required. About 10 or 20 years ago, so many talented actors were breaking into Hollywood through sitcoms and movies, and tons of singers were making it big on shows like American Idol. Now, more and more, actors are singing and singers are acting, and random people are becoming famous for their money and botox injections.

At least we have something juicy to read in magazines..I guess…

The controversy surrounding Kony 2012

What is going on with all the Kony 2012/Jason Russell drama? I stumbled upon a few articles last night that are saying how Russell being hospitalized is jeopardizing the entire project. Another one said that Kony 2012 is more about Jason Russell than actually capturing Joseph Kony. Is all of this true though?

First of all, even though Russell is the mastermind behind Kony 2012, it has gained so much momentum and struck so much interest in people around the world, that it would be difficult for it to just collapse. Regardless of where he is, he has other people working with him. Kony 2012 has offices all over America, and supporters world wide. One of the criticisms that their campaign received from a student was that they are “narrow minded” to think that resolving this problem is easy. Another professor said that the region in Northern Uganda where Kony is running his operation has not seen turmoil in several years. She suggested that Russell and the rest of the Kony 2012 team channel their efforts to more active war lords in Uganda. This makes perfect sense, but contrary to the negative media, Kony 2012 can be a success because:

1. Movements like this have a domino effect, only a bit slower. See, the problem is the governments in these countries do not use their power to abolish child soldier practices because of the mass population, and possibly corruption. Russell’s campaign can stop Kony in Uganda, by which time they might have the power to influence the Ugandan politicians to implement the rules more strongly. Once that happens, they can make similar projects in the rest of Africa. I know it’s easier said than done, but anything is possible. Honestly, that is why Kony 2012 is took off with a deafening bang – because Russell and his team believed it was possible.

2. Russell and his team may have oversimplified the situation, but with a Facebook page, a Twitter account and a website they are obviously encouraging people to get involved. Of course their goals would be slightly more difficult to reach if they were all alone, but they have almost the entire world on their side! As much as we admire Russell for initiating this, he cannot override the power of the supporters.

Now the next problem is the fact that YouTube disable the comment button, meaning about 500,000 comments got deleted from the video. This is what one article calls “invisible media” – they are saying that “we don’t interact as much as we respond” Basically, everybody has their say, but interaction can be more difficult on social media sites than when people are talking face to face. Yes, our lives do frequently run on social media, because it makes communication easier. Especially for a campaign that is this huge, it would be impossible for everyone to interact in person – social media solves this problem. The fact that YouTube does not allow people to post comments is the best for Kony 2012. Often, people will post comments that are critical or negative, and even though freedom of speech allows them to do this, the video is not the place to do so. There are other ways to express your disagreement with Kony 2012, through your Facebook status, your blog, Twitter, or whatever. The video and all the other social media surrounding the movement are all working towards a goal. Negative comments will only steer away from that. The team is obviously very important to the success of this campaign, but they cannot have all the light shone on them. This is not about them as much as it is about their common goal to stop war lords like Joseph Kony, and to protect the children who are at risk. The only way Kony 2012 can fail is if everyone loses focus.

Many thoughts going out to the Kony 2012 team!
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References: http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1142287–kony-2012-campaign-goes-viral-in-an-effort-to-help-hunt-down-ugandan-warlord-joseph-kony
http://theconversation.edu.au/kony-2012-and-the-case-of-the-invisible-media-5954 http://www.mysanantonio.com/opinion/columnists/maria_anglin/article/Viral-video-shines-too-much-light-on-Jason-Russell-3430446.php http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/24/us-uganda-kony-future-idUSBRE82N00P20120324